Monthly Archives: September 2009

A Ray of Sunshine

Lisa RayCanadian actress Lisa Ray has recently started blogging. And hers isn’t one of those ‘read me and splash me over headlines’ kind of blog. It’s personal, candid, sincere and real.

Lisa was diagnosed with Multiple Myeloma, a rare and incurable cancer of the white blood cells, in June 2009.

She’s turned to writing not so much as to feed us peeping-Toms a vicarious peek into her life. But because she’s got “much more to say now than ever before…”

Her ‘Yellow Diaries’ take us through the physical transformation one day at a time. From the steroids that make her feel like a ‘wetsuit’ to the events she’s got lined up to the food cravings she’s got.

As a reader, one is bound to love her writing with its deadpan humour, grit and realism. As a fan, it’s bound to make you grow fonder of her as she opens up to us with her doubts, insecurities and reassurances.

Her blog is a great away to spread cancer awareness and especially that of Myeloma. “I’m going to do everything I can to wrench the spotlight onto Myeloma and cancer awareness. I believe it can be cured. That’s the dirty realist in me,” she writes.

Writing is an empowering feeling, and that’s probably what it is to her. And she does it with great style in the hardest of times.

Aparanjeetha Sambandan

Remembering the Man of the Moment

Remembering the Man of the Moment
“Why are you hiding YSR? He is the man of the moment.”
My former boss, a guru to many Internet journalists, wasn’t
amused when I downplayed the story of Y S Rajasekhara Reddy’s
huge victory at the Assembly elections in
2004.
I justified myself, saying that Delhi was certainly more
interesting than Andhra Pradesh on a day when the Lok Sabha
election results were announced. The entire nation was
animatedly discussing the pros and cons of Sonia Gandhi
becoming Prime Minister.
“You must be able to see what YSR has done and achieved.
Haven`t you heard about his Padayaatra and his mass support?
His efforts are helping the Congress come back to power after
10 years. So put it as the second lead on home page,“ my boss
ordered.
I grudgingly obeyed,  believing that I knew better.
My ill-will faded when I read the newspapers the next day.
All of them had given YSR great prominence.
I forced myself to read the details of his 1400-km foot
pilgrimage (Padayaatra) to the backward areas of the state,
his humanitarianism and his popular support.
Five years later, during the Assembly elections held in May
2009, there were stories about corruption charges against YSR. I brushed them aside, because I’d read and listened enough to know these stories were not true.
I don`t know what my previous boss would have said to my not
giving importance to those stories.
If he had asked me to highlight those stories, I would
probably have said: “Sir, he will be the man of the hour this
time too.”
On a day when the nation mourns his death, I know the
footprints YSR has left behind will continue to inspire
generations.

YSR“Why are you hiding YSR? He is the man of the moment.”

My former boss, a guru to many Internet journalists, wasn’t  amused when I downplayed the story of Y S Rajasekhara Reddy’s huge victory at the Assembly elections in 2004.

I justified myself, saying that Delhi was certainly more interesting than Andhra Pradesh on a day when the Lok Sabha election results were announced. The entire nation was too busy discussing if Sonia Gandhi should become Prime Minister.

“You must be able to see what YSR has done and achieved.  Haven’t you heard about his Padayaatra and his mass support? His efforts are helping the Congress come back to power after 10 years. So put it as the second lead on home page,” my boss ordered.

I grudgingly obeyed,  believing that I knew better.

My resentment faded when I read the newspapers the next day.  All of them had given YSR great prominence — just like my boss had predicted.

I forced myself to read the details of his 1400-km foot pilgrimage (Padayaatra) to the backward areas of the state, his humanitarianism and his popular support.

Five years later, during the Assembly elections held in May 2009, there were stories about corruption charges against YSR. I brushed them aside because by then,  I’d read and listened enough to know these stories were not true.

I don’t know what my previous boss would have said to my not giving importance to those stories.

If he had asked me to highlight those stories, I would probably have said: “Sir, he will be the man of the hour this time, too.”

On a day when the nation mourns his death, I know the footprints YSR has left behind will continue to inspire generations.

Salil Jose